Saturday, December 31, 2011

Stress-free Job Hunting Guide

Hunting for the perfect job for an individual requires time, effort and knowledge. 

For stress free job-hunting, every individual must first consider the following pointers before starting your job hunting process:

1. Know what type of job you would like to apply for.   Gate crashing job fairs that offer work not related to one's degree or work preference would be a waste of time.

Consider your interests, preference of work location and job shifts (to be especially considered by professionals who have family members to take care of).  If all these fit the category of the job opening available, it would be best to proceed with the application process.

2. Prepare possible needed documents or career portfolio.  Have several copies of your resume, transcript of records and any certifications ready for immediate submission if needed.

3. Know where to look for job postings.  There are various forms that offer listing of jobs.   Below are some of these sites:

3.1 Internet. One of most widely used searching options is the Internet.  Aside from the fact that browsing the Internet for available jobs is less time consuming than personal appearances to inquire at the offices, this can also be the least expensive form of job hunting.

You would not need to buy newspapers to browse through the ads for vacancies nor spend gas money to go to the offices.

Not only local or national vacancies can be browsed through the net, international job openings could likewise be easily accessed by the user, thus, offering one a much wider perspective in choosing the right job.

3.2 Newspapers.  One of the most commonly used searching medium.  Local newspapers advertise jobs that are within an applicant's commuting distance.  Available jobs are usually printed on a regular basis.

3.3 Career or Job Centers.  These usually offer jobs for ages 16-18 and rarely above 21 years of age.  Though fully loaded with vacancies, it caters mostly to the younger applicants.

Job listings are frequently updated; therefore regular visits would ensure the applicants of new job postings.

3.4 Periodicals or magazines.  Professionals are best advised to look for jobs on magazines since employers that would want to hire the same would advertise on such journals.

3.5 Offices.  Most offices have postings of job openings on their Vacancy Boards.  Applicants may directly go to the office to look for vacancies and then directly submit the resume or other pertinent documents to the respective division that receives such documents.

Friday, December 30, 2011

Job Hunting Tips

Hunting for jobs nowadays is a very competitive and sometimes cut-throat affair. Here are a few tips to help you get the edge in searching out and landing the job of your dreams.

The Curriculum Vitae
The CV is the first, and at most times the most important part of applying for a job. Since potential employers have to whittle down practically hundreds of applications to a few valid ones, they will have to base their narrowing down efforts using the CV they have collected.

Studies have shown that about half of the employers decide to accept or reject job applications based on the related work experience listed in the CV. A third of the employers decide to reject or accept these job applications based on the layout design of these applications.

1. Make Your CV Stand Out
When preparing your CV, make sure your CV stands out among the rest. It should be the type that is appealing to the eyes, making the evaluating personnel want to read the CV. Step two is for you to make sure your CV lists the related work experience you have had in relation to the job you are applying for.

1. Make Your CV Concise and Relevant
Avoid making your CVs too long. It may make it irrelevant to the evaluator. Remember that the employer is a person to whom time is important. If your CV shows that you value his/her time while showing the most relevant information in the least amount of time, you will have won one important battle.

2. Always tailor your CV to the job.
You may have had previous experience that may not be related to the job you are applying for. Some people keep many different versions of their CV for different job opening purposes. Make sure your CV is appropriate for the job. A one-size-fits-all CV may not be the best way to go since the employer will have the impression that your previous efforts have not been focused enough to produce any specialization on your part.

3. Write about your achievements
You may add your achievements, but make your statements factual and relevant. It does not do harm to advertise yourself, but make your advertisement matter-of-fact and not just hot air. You may want to skip on listing your weak points as the CV is not the avenue for such discussions.

4. Polish Your CV
Your employer will know if you have put enough time producing your CV. If he/she sees that you have put sufficient and thorough effort into your CV, he/she will assume that you will do the same in your work. This is a big plus for you. It is not uncommon for some people to spend days or even weeks polishing and buffing their CV.

Online Job Hunting

There was a time when a person who wanted to find work had to buy newspaper and look through the classified ads section.  The advent of the internet has changed that by creating opportunities for people to work either in a different state or in another country.

It has made the world a smaller place rendering it accessible for anyone with a computer to search for a job and apply to it.

There are many sites that offer such services. All the person has to do is open an account, fill up the necessary fields then submit your resume.

These sites usually ask for pertinent information such as the person’s name, age, address, contact number and social security number.

Additional information that will be requested is educational background. Employment history is also another thing that has to be mentioned which includes the job description and highlights that one has experienced during that person’s career. 
A section in the account will also ask the preferred industry of work, if the person is willing to do field work or open to relocation and the expected salary should one be accepted for the job.

With all the information provided, these sites will then match your qualifications with the jobs available.  This service is free and matches can be seen when the person logs on the account or gets a notice via email.

Some sites offer a service with a fee that will place the resume over other applicants giving that person more priority but even that is a not a guarantee that one will get the job.

Online job hunting is not just for professionals. It caters to anyone who wants to work either full time, part time or on a per project basis. 

Applying online is not only done through job sites. You can also check the websites of companies that usually have a section on careers to see what openings are available. You simply have to go through the process of giving certain information and uploading your resume.

There are many jobs available in the market. The internet has made it easier for companies to make people aware that there are vacancies available. It has also made it convenient for applicants to apply online instead of walking to an office and dropping of a resume. With everything that is just a mouse click away, all it takes is a little effort on one’s part to sit down in front of a computer and looking for a job.

Thursday, December 29, 2011

The Job Interview

The second step in getting a job is having an interview with a potential employer. The first step was sending your application and after careful review by the company, you are seen as candidate for the vacant position.

The employer got this information through an ad that was placed in the paper, referred by someone in the company or a headhunter, or by a person who simply submitted an application via the company’s website. 

The first impression employers always look at is your resume. Given the many that apply, this usually takes about 30 seconds and so with the limited words, one must be sure that the resume is well written and grammatically correct.

During the interview, most employers want to know more about person since the resume only gives certain information such as the person’s name, age, address, contact number,  social security number, past and current employment.

The employer will likely ask about the experiences, lessons and accomplishments one has done and learned working for another employer. This will usually include how the person handled a situation in the company, the challenges of the job and the relationship with coworkers.

Another question will be the relationship between the applicant and family members. This shows character with how the person interacts with people who are close and those that know the person for a long time.

The employer will usually ask why the person applied in the company and where you would like to be in 5 to 10 years. Long term questions such as this will show if there is dedication for the job at hand and if the company can provide something beneficial for both the applicant and the employer.

Companies follow a certain budget in hiring qualified personnel which is why the interviewer will ask how much one desires to get for the job. If what is being asked is too high, the employer will usually ask if the salary is open to negotiation.

After the employer asks questions, room is usually given for the applicant to ask questions in return. This is the best time to know a little bit more the company one might be working in and to get a feel of the potential company.

If there are no more questions, the interviewer will then end the meeting and call the applicant back if the person has passed the initial interview so that the next phase of the application process can begin.